Locks of Love | Caring for Kids with Medical Hair Loss

I’m a hairstylist. I know how important hair is to people. Believe me… I know.Back in cosmetology school, part of the definition of hair was to “adorn the head“. There was no other specific physiological purpose of hair, but as many of us already know… hair is part of our identity.

How we color it, cut it, style it, (or shave it all off!) has a mark on our identity and the image we are sending out in the world. Hair can be the first impression you have of someone; or the first impression you give.

Unfortunately, due to many medical reasons such as chemotherapy for cancer treatment, trichophagia, trichotillomania, and alopecia; many underprivileged children facing these conditions simply cannot afford to replace the hair they have lost, through artificial means.

In addition to battling various medical conditions, it is often made worse for children who face these situations without the comfort of looking like everyone else.

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Locks of Love has been for as long as I have been a stylist. The unique opportunity they provide for low income families that have children with medically documented hair-loss, is priceless.

Over the years I have cut off many ponytails and sent them to Locks of Love. I know how hard it is to part with our hair…

In order for a donation to qualify for donation, the hair must be:

  • at least 10 inches in length
  • secured in a ponytail or braid before it is cut
  • clean and completely dry before it is mailed in
  • placed inside of a plastic bag and then inside of a padded plastic envelope

You will also have to fill out a donation form and mail it in to:

2925 10th Avenue N
Suite 102
Lake Worth, FL 33461-3099

I can say undeniably, the biggest show of support for this cause comes at the hands of other children!

100% of the donations that I have sent in to Locks of Love have all been donated by young children.

Imagine that.

Julie Ferenzi Signature

2 Responses to “Locks of Love | Caring for Kids with Medical Hair Loss”

  1. Sarah Cooper November 28, 2007 at 10:37 pm #

    Julie, my daughter Tall One has trichotillomania. It seems to be connected to her growth spurts, and when she hit puberty she pulled it ALL. It was painful enough to watch her go through it, I can’t imagine how hard it must have been to live through. Kids can be cruel, but she has good friends. She has told me she wants to help other kids, and she has long hair now … but she says she wants to keep it for now. :o) I can’t blame her for that!

    (I wanted to donate mine but it’s bleached, and they couldn’t take it.)

  2. Sarah Cooper November 28, 2007 at 10:38 pm #

    Julie, my daughter Tall One has trichotillomania. It seems to be connected to her growth spurts, and when she hit puberty she pulled it ALL. It was painful enough to watch her go through it, I can’t imagine how hard it must have been to live through. Kids can be cruel, but she has good friends. She has told me she wants to help other kids, and she has long hair now … but she says she wants to keep it for now. :o) I can’t blame her for that!

    (I wanted to donate mine but it’s bleached, and they couldn’t take it.)

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